Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 12th International Conference & Exhibition on Biosensors & Bioelectronics | Vancouver | British Columbia | Canada.

Day 1 :

Biosensors & Bioelectronics 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jens Ducrée photo
Biography:

Dr. Jens Ducrée holds a Full Professorship of Microsystems in the School of Physical Sciences at Dublin City University (DCU), Ireland. He is the founding director of Ireland’s first Fraunhofer Project Centre for Embedded Bioanalytical Systems at DCU ([email protected]) – a joint initiative of Science Foundation Ireland and Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. He  is also academic member of the National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR) and the 3U Joint Institute of Global Health (JIGH), and a principal investigator for Microfluidic Platforms at the Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI) since 2008.

The main part of his research is directed towards novel microfluidic systems and associated actuation, detection, fabrication and instrumentation technologies for the integration, automation, miniaturization and parallelization of sample preparation and detection of bioanalytical assays (e.g. immunoassays, nucleic acid testing, general chemistry and cell counting). Typical applications of these next-generation “Lab-on-a-Chip” platforms are sample-to-answer systems for biomedical point-of-care and global diagnostics, liquid handling automation for the life sciences (e.g. concentration / purification and amplification of DNA / RNA from a range of biosamples), process analytical techniques and cell line development for biopharma as well as monitoring the environment, infrastructure, industrial processes and agrifood.

Abstract:

The successful commercialisation of microfluidics-enabled solutions in the context of the life sciences is typically led by significant techno-economical challenges on performance, reliability and cost of development and manufacture. With the example of the centrifugal microfluidic “Lab-on-a-Disc” technology, this paper outlines a platform-based approach for expediting and de-risking the route from proof-of-concepts to high technology readiness levels as adopted from mature industries. Rather than starting from scratch, new applications are flexibly configured from a geometrically parametrised design library of Laboratory Unit Operations, e.g. for particle separation, metering and mixing, that are interconnected by flow control elements such as valves for comprehensive sample-to-answer automation of common (bio-)assay protocols, e.g. for small molecules, proteins / antibodies, nucleic acids and bioparticles such as cells. The development kit encompasses experimental and simulation tools to validate functional robustness, guidelines for design and scale-up of manufacture, and standard procedures for system- and component-level characterisation. The modular strategy also offers opportunity towards accelerating regulatory processes and for coordinating industrial supply chains.

 

Keynote Forum

Tianhong Cui

Distinguished McKnight University Professor, University of Minnesota, USA

Keynote: Shrink polymer biosensors: Manufacturing from micro to nano
Biosensors & Bioelectronics 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tianhong Cui photo
Biography:

Dr.Tianhong Cui is currently a Distinguished McKnight University Professor at the University of Minnesota. He is a Professor in Mechanical Engineering and an Affiliate Senior Member of the graduate faculty in Department of Electrical Engineering and Department of Biomedical Engineering. He joined the faculty of the University of Minnesota in 2003. From 1995 to 2003, he held research or faculty positions at Tsinghua University, University of Minnesota, National Laboratory of Metrology in Japan, and Louisiana Tech University. He is an Adjunct Professor at Mayo Clinic, a Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the University of Cambridge, and a Laureate of Blaise Pascal Chair from the ENS Foundation in France. He is a Fellow of American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME).

His current research interests include MEMS and nanotechnology. He has more than 310 archived publications in scientific journals and prestigious conferences. He received awards including the STA & NEDO Fellowships in Japan, the Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship in Germany, the Research Foundation Award from Louisiana Tech University, the Richard & Barbara Endowed Chair and the Distinguished McKnight University Professorship from the University of Minnesota, the Distinguished Visiting Professorships from University of Paris East and Tsinghua University, the Blaise Pascal Chair for Excellence from ENS Foundation in France, the Distinguished Visiting Fellowship from the Royal Academy of Engineering in UK, the Outstanding Editor Award from Chinese Academy of Sciences/ Nature Publishing Group, and numerous best paper awards. He is the founding Executive Editor-in-Chief for two Nature journals, Light: Science & Applications and Microsystems & Nanoengineering. He is also serving as the founding Editor-in-Chief for the first AAAS/Science Partner Journal titled Research.

Abstract:

Polymer shrinkage becomes a new approach to do lithography and generate smaller structures by reforming larger pre-patterned structures. The facile polymer fabrication approach by embossing and thermoplastic shrinkage aims to do lithography in a nanoscale or reduce the feature size and dramatically increase the aspect ratio of imprinted microstructures. The shrinkage capability of embossed microstructures is obtained by molding at low temperatures for less cycle time. Embossed patterns are activated for shrinkage by removing projected structures and heating at higher temperatures. The final structures are defined with the shape of removed materials before shrinking polymer materials. Both two- and three-dimensional embossed structures were successfully shrunk into much smaller scale. This polymer-shrinking process brings a new way to extend the fabrication capability of polymer embossing process towards MEMS-based biosensors. This talk will present shrink polymer for nanolithography, high-aspect-ratio microstructures, and biosensors for medical applications.

Keynote Forum

Jun Yang

Professor, Director, Western’s Industry 4.0 Network, Western University, Canada

Keynote: From Lab-on-a-chip to Lab-on-a-tip for Point-of-care Diagnostics of whole blood samples
Biosensors & Bioelectronics 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jun Yang photo
Biography:

Jun Yang is Professor in Mechanical & Materials Engineering and Biomedical Engineering, and Director of WIN 4.0 (Western’s Industry 4.0 Network) at Western University (The University of Western Ontario). He is a Principle Investigator of Micro-Nano-Bio Systems Lab at Western University, Canada and and Fellow of The Canadian Academy of Engineering. His research interests include Additive Engineering, 3D Printing, Printed Electronics, Metamaterials, Acoustics, MEMS/NEMS, Sensors, Lab-on-a-chip/Biochip, Membrane Separation/Filtration, Surface Science and Engineering, Microbial Fuel Cells, SPM (AFM/STM), Polymer Nanocomposites, Nanomaterials, Nanotechnology, Green Technologies. He has published more than 120 papers including multiple cover articles in high-quality journals. He has given ~ 80 plenary/keynote/invited talks on conferences, symposiums, and workshops. He has received numerous awards. Three of his inventions have been transferred to industries for mass production.

Abstract:

Point-of-care (POC) testing offers rapid results of diagnostics near the site of patient care, which can significantly improve health care and management of infectious diseases. Blood tests are the most commonly-used diagnostic methods nowadays because blood analyses provide definitive information of medical conditions of patients. Traditional blood tests are conducted using large-scale blood analyzers, which are equipped in centralized laboratories and only operated by highly trained personnel. The traditional blood tests are time and cost consuming, and labor extensive. With the development of Lab-on-a-chip technology, biochemical experiments can be performed automatically on single chips. However on-chip blood testing is challenging because the whole blood is a complex non-Newtonian fluid with high constituent of blood cells. Here I will present our recent developments of Lab-on-a-chip and Lab-on-a-tip technologies, i.e. integrating chemical biosensors into Lab-on-a-CD devices and integrating surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on optical fibers, for POC diagnostics of whole blood samples.

Keynote Forum

Hidekuni Takao

Full Professor & Director, Kagawa University, JAPAN

Keynote: Reploducing our Fingertip Sensation by Super High Resolution Tactile Sensing
Biosensors & Bioelectronics 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hidekuni Takao photo
Biography:

Prof. Hidekuni Takao, received his BS in 1993, MS in 1995 and Ph.D. degree in 1998 all from Toyohashi University of Technology, Japan. After he worked as a research fellow (PD) with JSPS, Japan in 1998, he joined faculty of Toyohashi University of Technology in 1999 as assistant professor, and was promoted to associate professor in 2005. He moved to Kagawa University, Japan in 2009, where he has served as a full professor since 2014. He is also holding the position of  director of Nano-Micro Structure Device Integrated Research Center in the same University. His research interests are high performance silicon MEMS sensors and systems and their applications to fine tactile sensing technology. Since 2015, he has been the representative of JST-CREST project on “nano-tactile sensing”. He acted as a technical committee member of IEEE MEMS 2012 Paris, 2013 Taipei, 2017 Las Vegass, and 2018 Belfast.

Abstract:

We, human has very sophisticated sense of touch on our fingertip skin. We can recognize and distinguish various and delicate difference of touch feelings obtained by sweep motion of fingertip on various kinds of materials and objects. Fingertip skin has the highest desity of force and vibration receipters (Meissner’s Corpuscles and Merkel Cells) under the surface skin where fine pitch patterns of fingerprint are formed on. Human’s fingertip has a very high spatial resolution below 100µm and can recognize existance of 13nm-pitch patterns as reported recently.

In order to reploduce artificial sense of touch like human's fingertip, very high performances   on spatial resolution and sensitivity are required to tactile sensors. In this talk, silicon based MEMS tactile sensors with a ultra-high force and spatial resolutions are introduced and demonstrated. All the mechanical structures in the tactile sensor deice are made from “pure” single crystal silicon layer of SOI wafers. No elaster/polymer strucures are The contactor parts of the tactile sensor have curved shape which is very similar to the cross-section of a fingerprint, and its suspension springs are desined similarly to a spring constant of human’s fingertip skin surface. In the latest version of our tactile sensors, six contactors with fingerprint-like shape are integrated at a pitch of 500µm to get high spatial resolution tactile images.Each fingerprint-like contacors reproduces vertical motion (by micro roughness) and horizontal motion (by frictional force) of a fingerprint closely under sweeping motion of fingertip in measurement. Spatial resolution of our tactile sensor reaches to sub-micron region, and its force resolution of friction is below 50µN. These performance is engough high to analyze surface touch feelings of “Hair surface condition”, “Skin condition”, and “Touch feeling of various papers and clothes” like human fingertip. Mahine learning based on deep newural network has been applied to the signal from the high resolution tactile sensors. As a result, 10 kinds of “cloth” samples have been discriminated at a correct persentage of 99% successfully. Combination of high resolution tactile sensor and deep neural network is a strong approach to reploduce human fingertip sensation by state-of-the-art device electron device technology.

Keynote Forum

Xiaohong Wang

Professor, Institute of Microelectronics, Tsinghua University, China

Keynote: On-chip energy harvesting and storage for wearable or implantable applications
Biosensors & Bioelectronics 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Xiaohong Wang photo
Biography:

Xiaohong (Ellen) Wang is full professor in Department of Microelectronics and Nanoelectronics, Tsinghua University, China, guest professor in ETH Zürich, Switzerland. She received her Ph.D. from Tsinghua University in Mechanical Engineering. As a visiting scholar, she did the research on micro SOFC in Stanford University from Nov. 2005 to Oct. 2006. She also had several months’ research experience in HKUST and UCLA in 2001 and 2007, respectively. Her research now is on the fields of MEMS/NEMS design and integration technologies, in particular on Power-MEMS, like micro fuel cells, micro supercapacitors, silicon-based lithium batteries, and biological microgenerators etc. She has served several international conferences as TPC/ETPC member, like IEEE-IEDM, IEEE-MEMS, Transducers, PowerMEMS etc. She was the General Co-Chair of IEEE-MEMS2016 held in Shanghai. She is an Associate Editor of IEEE/ASME JMEMS and PNG Microsystems & Nanoengineering, Editorial Advisory Board member of JMM.

Abstract:

The rapid development of wearable and implantable electronics has greatly increased the demand for energy harvesting and storage devices with similar physical properties and integration capability. Nowadays. Li-ion batteries have been being still mainstream as their high power and voltage output. Can we convert energy in the human body into electricity can provide a life-long power source to apply in various wearable electronics and potentially in implanted microdevices? Can we also store the energy into supercapacitors with the high charge/discharge rate, long cycle life, and high-energy efficiency? This speech will introduce the development of energy harvesting and storage on-chip for wearable or implantable applications.

Keynote Forum

Mahmoud Almasri

Professor and Principal Investigator, University of Missouri, USA

Keynote: Impedance biosensors for simultaneous detection of food borne pathogens
Biosensors & Bioelectronics 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mahmoud Almasri photo
Biography:

Mahmoud Almasri is an Associate Professor and Principal Investigator in Microsystem Research Lab (MRL) in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at the University of Missouri, USA. He received BSc and MSc degrees in physics from Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey, in 1995 and 1997, respectively, and a PhD in electrical engineering from Southern Methodist University (SMU), Dallas, TX, in 2001. In 2004-2005, he was with Georgia Institute of Technology as a post-doctoral fellow, and a research scientist. He’s research and published materials include uncooled infrared microblometers, micromirrors, Coulter counter, micropost array for mapping cell traction forces, wafer level packaging and three-dimensional microscaffolds for brain slice and neuronal network studies in vitro and in situ.

Abstract:

TBA

Keynote Forum

Seokheun “Sean” Choi

Professor and Director, State University of New York-Binghamton, USA

Keynote: Powering biosensors with disposable biobatteries
Biosensors & Bioelectronics 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Seokheun “Sean” Choi photo
Biography:

Seokheun “Sean” Choi is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at State University of New York (SUNY)-Binghamton. Currently, he is running “Bioelectronics & Microsystems Lab” as a Director and “Center for Research in Advanced Sensing Technologies & Environmental Sustainability” as an Associate Director at SUNY-Binghamton. Prior to joining SUNY-Binghamton, he was a research professor in the School of Electronic & Computing Systems at the University of Cincinnati. He received his Ph.D. degree in bioelectronics from Arizona State University in 2011. His current research focuses on next generation “Biosensing and Bioenergy technologies,” including self-powered biosensors, wearable and stretchable sensors, biobatteries, papertronics, and fibertronics. He has been recognized as a pioneer in micro-sized biobatteries and paper-based biosensing systems. Over the years, he has secured funding over $2.5 million from NSF, ONR, and SUNY Research Foundation. He has authored over 100 journal and conference articles, two book chapters, and one book, and hold two U.S. patents.

Abstract:

Effective and rapid diagnostics have the capability to revolutionize public healthcare both in developed and developing countries. One of the key challenges that is critical to address in developing biosensors is to effectively and sufficiently power them. In developing countries, where the electricity grid is not well established and the use of batteries is not cost-effective, power supplies are the most problematic issue for stand-alone and self-sustained devices.

In this talk, Prof. Choi will provide an overview of techniques for powering diagnostic devices for use in both developed and developing countries, as well as detailed discussions of recent advancements in biosensors. He will also discuss next-generation diagnostics and their power source strategies.

Keynote Forum

Anhong Zhou

Professor & Editorial Board Member, Utah State University, USA

Keynote: TBA
Biosensors & Bioelectronics 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Anhong Zhou photo
Biography:

Dr. Anhong Zhou is a Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Engineering, Utah State University, USA and Editorial borad member of Journal of Biosensors & Bioelectronics. He earned his PhD (2000) in Biosensors at Hunan University, China. He has published about fifty peer reviewed journal papers and he was author of one book chapter. He has been teaching experience of more than fifteen years at USU. He served as members of American Chemical Society (ACS), Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES), Electrochemical Society (ECS), Institute of Biological Engineering (IBE), Materials Research Society (MRS), American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and the International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE). He served as a reviewer for more than forty peerreviewed journals in the areas of biosensors materials science and engineering biointerface nanotechnology and biomechanics.

His research area is focused on the molecular and cellular sensing and bioimaging, including the fabrication and intergration of chemical sensors, biosensors, and bio-microdevices.

Abstract:

TBA

Keynote Forum

Xian-En Zhang

Full Professor, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China

Keynote: TBA
Biosensors & Bioelectronics 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Xian-En Zhang photo
Biography:

Professor Xian-En Zhang received his B.Sc. (Biology) from Hubei University in 1982, M.Phil. (Microbiology) and Ph.D. (Biochemistry) later from the Institute of Virology and the Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), respectively. In 2015, he received an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Science from the University of Alberta, Canada. In 1993, he became a full professor at Wuhan Institute of Virology, CAS. He has been active in interdisciplinary sciences, specializing in biosensors, nanobiology and analytical pathogen microbiology. He has published more than 230 peer-reviewed papers and three books on biosensors. In April 2013, he completed his duty in MOST and joined the Institute of Biophysics (IBP), CAS, and is now a distinguished professor in the Center of Excellence of Macromolecules of IBP, CAS, while serve as the China’s representative to the APEC Chief Science Advisors and Equivalents Meeting.

His recent research directions include molecular/nano biosensors for biological events in live cells, viral/microbial elements-derived nano-biosensors, and portable biosensors for health care.

Abstract:

TBA